“Places matter. Their rules, their scale, their design include or exclude civil society, pedestrianism, equality, diversity (economic and otherwise), understanding of where water comes from and garbage goes, consumption or conservation. They map our lives [...] the way we inhabit places also matters, and that comes from experience, imagination, belief, and desire as much as or more than from architecture and design. In other words, the mind and the terrain shape each other: every landscape is a landscape of desire to some degree, if not always for its inhabitants”
Solnit, R. 2007. Storming the Gates of Paradise: Landscapes for Politics, p.9.

© 2017 by Gwenaël Velge

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Gwenaël and his wife Cielito invite you for dinner.

They have made The Art Space Collective their new home for the months of May and June. They are inviting guests for a singular artistic experience aiming to collectively explore the homeliness of the alien, and the uncanniness of the familiar, in hauntingly Australian outback minescapes.

If, as Freud argues, the uncanny is a sub-species of the familiar, it may then serve as a key to illuminating understandings of what makes a home, Home. Mixing art forms, settings and perspectives, Homing the Unhomely hopes to creatively and collectively address themes of home, trauma and identity.

Gwenaël is collaborating with Brendon Briggs who will be contributing his lyrical writing to the show by weaving in fractured narrative elements, in dialogue with the landscapes featured.

Gwenaël also hopes to collaborate with the audience to breathe in new meaning into, and thus alter the mode of existence of, the landscapes displayed. Indeed, performing the art exhibition as a homely family dinner, Homing the Unhomely invites the audience to contribute to the Home, to co-author the artwork, and (re)define the landscapes they speak of. 

Expect no fuss or fluff, this is not a fancy dinner, but it will be heart-warming food and an art experience to share in an intimate and unusual setting; what better way to explore the darker – yet beautiful – sides of landscapes and thus also of ourselves, than from the comforting grounds of the family Home?

And thus, Homing the Unhomely welcomes you to welcome the unhomely.

"I’ve been stuck on what is over that bank. When I climbed the Gascoyne river bed wall. That steep path. What was over there? I feel like I could work it out. If I could go out and walk again. But I’m stuck here. I tried sitting outside. And sitting in here. But my memory is at a distance. It’s out there on those walks. In here is just the now. And the now is missing."