“Places matter. Their rules, their scale, their design include or exclude civil society, pedestrianism, equality, diversity (economic and otherwise), understanding of where water comes from and garbage goes, consumption or conservation. They map our lives [...] the way we inhabit places also matters, and that comes from experience, imagination, belief, and desire as much as or more than from architecture and design. In other words, the mind and the terrain shape each other: every landscape is a landscape of desire to some degree, if not always for its inhabitants”
Solnit, R. 2007. Storming the Gates of Paradise: Landscapes for Politics, p.9.

© 2017 by Gwenaël Velge

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< simulation / simulacra / sisyphus >

1:81

PS Art Space, Fremantle, WA

October 2017

See gallery here.

​I) [...] at least one of the following propositions is true: (1) the human species is very likely to go extinct before reaching a posthuman stage; (2) any posthuman civilization is extremely unlikely to run a significant number of simulations of their evolutionary history (or variations thereof); (3) we are almost certainly living in a computer simulation. It follows that the belief that there is a significant chance that we will one day become posthumans who run ancestor-simulations is false, unless we are currently living in a simulation.    

II) The simulacrum is never what hides the truth - it is truth that hides the fact that there is none.The simulacrum is true.

 

 

III) I leave Sisyphus at the foot of the mountain! One always finds oneís burden again. But Sisyphus teaches the higher fidelity that negates the gods and raises rocks. He, too, concludes that all is well. This universe henceforth without a master seems to him neither sterile nor futile. Each atom of that stone, each mineral flake of that night-filled mountain, in itself forms a world. The struggle itself towards the heights is enough to fill a man's heart. One must imagine Sisyphus happy.

 1. Bostrom, N., 2003, Are You Living in a Computer Simulation?; Philosophical Quarterly, Vol. 53, No. 211.

 2. Baudrillard, J., 1994 (1981), Simulacra and Simulation; University of Michigan Press.

 3. Camus, A., 1955 (1942), The Myth of Sisyphus; Hamish Hamilton Ltd.

>_ virtual-reality.exec

simulation running.

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